Friday, August 20, 2010

Quotable Friday

In the "you have got to be kidding me" category:

For Lyz Olko, a designer of the punk-chic label Obesity and Speed, the layered floral/tough girl Elaine look is nostalgic. “My entire wardrobe consists of floral, denim and black leather,” she said. Recently Ms. Olko, a self-proclaimed pack rat, retrieved many of her ’90s dresses from storage to wear again. (“I was also into floral print rompers,” she noted, “but I’ve retired them.”) On a recent thrifting excursion, she emptied an entire rack of floral dresses into her cart.

“I went into Screaming Mimi’s the other day,” she said of the venerable vintage shop in NoLIta, “and it was all dresses you would see in Arizona.”

NY Times August 18

Sometimes I think that the New York Times zeitgeist-trackers need to get out more, and see some new people. And what exactly do they mean by, "all the dresses you would see in Arizona." Obscure Morman polygamist cult wear? Laura Ashley floral leg o'mutton sleeved atrocities? Annie Oakley costumes? Discuss.

4 comments:

Mary said...

Ah, Elaine on Seinfeld was my style hero. I love that blend of 30s office worker and Depression Era style.

Myra said...

Maybe older lady housedress dusters?

beangirl said...

At first glance, I was thinking she meant the lable "Arizona"... except I don't think they have a store, right? Aren't they the label at Sears or JCPenney or something?

Um.

Yeah, so I don't know what the hell this lady is trying to say. Or is it that the NYT people didn't know what the hell she was trying to say so their article made no sense?

Maybe "dresses you would see in Arizona" is, like, floral polyester patio dresses that 85 year old retirees wear. Awesome. I'm assuming they have the chenille house shoes to go with them, right? Oh wait, Myra already said that. Well, I still think that's awesome.

NancyDaQ said...

Yeah, it's an odd comment. Who knows, but I suspect it was some sort of fundamentalism reference. My ex-MIL never could figure out what state we lived in, other than "one of those large square ones out West."